Deutsche Kirche (German Church)

This church, originally built in 1917 in Hardin, Montana by Lutheran Volga German immigrants, is now part of the Big Horn County Historical Museum.  Back in its day, my Better Half’s father received his confirmation in this church.  The year was 1939.  After studying for the sacrament for nearly two years in German, as was common in his tightly-knit community, he suddenly had to relearn everything in English due to the outbreak of World War II in Europe.

Do you have a favorite photo below?  Any tips or tricks for photographing churches?


Deutsche Kirche Photo #1.  An exterior view of the Deutsche Kirche.


Deutsche Kirche Photo #2.  Looking toward the altar.


Deutsche Kirche Photo #3.  Having been raised Catholic, it was interesting to see church windows that were not stained glass.  


Deutsche Kirche Photo #4.  A shot of a pew.

Deutsche Kirche Photo #5.  From when the church was built in 1917 until World War II broke out in 1939, these books were in German, not English.

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6 thoughts on “Deutsche Kirche (German Church)

  1. Hi, found your blog via Kevin (BehindTheLens). I adore the simplicity of Lutheran churches. I can read German but not the old script, so I’ve been sitting here trying to decipher what it says above the alter (something about confidence in God perhaps?). It’s a fun tease, so thanks for a great shot that’s well lit. The windows are gorgeous!

    • Often the German spoken in the Volga German communities was a dialect. I can ask my parents if they can decipher it as they grew up in a similar Volga German community, only of Catholics, not Lutherans, and in Western Kansas, not Montana. :)

    • Its old German script and reads: “Gott ist unsere Zuversicht”. Could be translated into “God is our confidence” if that makes scense in English? The letter “s” and a few others looked quite diffrent from today.

      • Thanks so much, I’m grateful for the translation and for the photo that started it all (see how much one photo can inspire?).

      • Yes, that would make sense. What a great expression to help folks through a challenging time in history, especially when you consider that this church was built during World War I.

  2. I really like how you captured the simplicity of the church. Interesting to learn about the history and that they use German until 1939. My favorite is #5 the one with the books.

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