Commissioned by King Frederick William II of Prussia, the Brandenburg Gate was built to represent peace and was completed in 1791.  It leads to Unter den Linden, a famous boulevard lined with linden trees that once led to the Prussian palace. With 12 Doric columns, six on each side, the gate was inspired by the Propylaea, […]

Römerberg is the central square in Altstadt (Old Town), the historic center of Frankfurt, Germany, dating back to the city’s origin in 794. In the center of the Römerberg square is the Gerechtigkeitsbrunnen (Fountain of Justice).  It was built in 1543 and features the statue of goddess Justitia holding the scales of justice.   Justitia faces the Römer […]

The Santa Maria delle Grazie is a church and Dominican convent in Milan, Italy.  One of its claims to fame is the 15th century mural of The Last Supper by Leonardo da Vinci.  Although it was one of the few walls of the to survive WWII bombings, the mural is decaying so quickly that only a […]

With about 1,000 fewer graves than the American Cemetery and Memorial in Normandy, the Netherlands American Cemetery and Memorial in Margraten is the third largest war cemetery in Europe for unidentified soldiers who perished in WWII.  In addition to neat rows of more than 8,000 white crosses and Stars of David, Margraten has two walls […]

The 60 meter long, six meter wide, black and white slate-tiled gallery at Chateau de Chenonceau is built upon the Diane de Poitier bridge.  During the day, light pours into the beautiful room from 18 windows on both of the lengths of the room.  The room was officially opened in 1577 when Catherine de Medici […]